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This issue of CDTL Brief is the first of a two-part Brief that features the teaching practices of the 2005/2006 Annual Teaching Excellence Award (ATEA) winners.

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August 2007, Vol. 10 No. 3 Print Ready ArticlePrint-Ready
Talking the Talk and Walking the Walk: Teaching History at NUS
Associate Professor Brian P. Farrell
Department of History
Sometimes talking the talk and walking the walk seem like two contradictory goals, particularly when it comes to teaching history. Ours is a content heavy subject. There is simply no substitute for reading. Continue reading


Teaching: Share Your Passion and Have Fun
Associate Professor Milagros Rivera
Head, Communications and New Media Programme
Most excellent teachers seek to stretch their students' minds, encourage them to be critical thinkers and attempt to develop students' communication skills. The question is how we accomplish these. Continue reading


Taking Charge of Learning- Ownership, Learning and a Conducive Environment
Dr Robin Loon
Department of English Language and Literature
Teaching in Theatre Studies presents very specific challenges not open to other disciplines in the faculty: namely, there is a crucial practical aspect in some of the modules. In theatre studies, the teaching covers the three main learning domains: cognitive, psychomotor and affective. Continue reading

Can Computer-aided Instruction Effectively Replace Cadaverbased Learning in the Study of Human Anatomy?
Associate Professor Bay Boon Huat
Department of Anatomy
The mere mention of the word 'cadaver' elicits vivid images of medical students meticulously and painstakingly dissecting a preserved human body under the tutelage of anatomy lecturers in a laboratory setting. Continue reading

A Perspective on Medical Education
Dr Loh Kwok Seng
Department of Otolaryngology
Traditionally the teaching of medicine has followed the principle of apprenticeship. Through a long and often arduous process, knowledge and skills are imparted to students by getting them to work under a more experienced doctor for a particular period of time. Continue reading

Excuse Me, Are You an Excellent Teacher?
Associate Professor Tan Ern Ser
Department of Sociology
When I was asked to share my teaching philosophy and what I think are the qualities of an excellent teacher, my first concern was that I would end up saying things that are rather cliché and have probably been rehashed countless times by many others. Continue reading


The Empirics of Teaching Quality
Associate Professor Willie Tan
Vice Dean (Academic)
School of Design and Environment
In 2005, I was asked by a persuasive colleague at CDTL to do a 'simple' preliminary study on whether class size (n) affects teaching student feedback scores (F). Intuitively, the answer is yes. Continue reading