Workshops/Seminars: January - June 2018

S/N Title   Date/Time
1 IVLE for teaching and learning: Getting started (IVLE: Part 1)
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Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
IVLE (Integrated Virtual Learning Environment) is a learning management system designed to facilitate and supplement teaching and thereby, promote student learning at NUS. A comprehensive introduction to IVLE, this hands-on workshop will enable you to create and manage a module with emphasis on the commonly used tools like the workbin and the discussion forum. It will also cover a brief overview of the other tools available in IVLE.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • create and setup a module;
  • plan and scaffold teaching and learning activities;
  • disseminate content and digital multimedia; and
  • provide an overview of assessment and survey tools.
11/01/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-4pm
2 Facilitating effective online discussions using IVLE (IVLE: Part 2)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
Online discussions are a great way of extending classroom discussions and learning by getting students to engage with course materials and readings. A discussion forum is one of the most frequently used learning technology tools that supports online discussion. It is an alternative form of communication to in-class, verbal discussion – whether simply to provide variety in the subject, to meet the different needs and preferences of individuals, or to allow students time to reflect on the debate and consider their response before contributing. Forums allow for time-delayed communication and asynchronous learning – anytime, anywhere. In this hands-on workshop, we will focus on IVLE discussion forum that is widely-used on campus.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • differentiate asynchronous and synchronous communication tools;
  • facilitate and manage discussions using forums in IVLE; and
  • reflect on ways to enhance student-teacher interaction both inside and outside the classroom.
12/01/2018 (Friday)
10am-12noon
3 Assessing student learning using IVLE (IVLE: Part 3)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
Assessment is a crucial element in enhancing the overall quality of teaching and learning in higher education. What and how students learn depends to a major extent on how they think they will be assessed (Biggs & Tang, 2007). This workshop focuses on the creation and use of assessment and quizzing materials for your courses using IVLE. Participants will discover how online assessment is valuable and how using these tools can create a dynamic learning environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • set up online tests and quizzes;
  • create question banks to create assessment questions, quizzes or MCQs;
  • analyse different situations for which an online assessment can be used; and
  • identify various approaches to provide timely and constructive feedback.
12/01/2018 (Friday)
2pm-4pm
4 Developing e-Learning resources using Camtasia Studio
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Facilitator(s): Charina Ong

Synopsis
Learn how to record, edit and share your lectures online using Camtasia Studio. This application allows you to easily capture everything happening from your computer screen with audio narration. It can even use PowerPoint directly to record your presentation.

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn to create effective video-based learning for your course. You will learn to record your screen, add voice narration, call-outs and other media files, editing techniques, and producing a professional online video.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:
  • apply the principles of multimedia design into presentation slides
  • record a lecture using Camtasia Recorder
  • add content to a Camtasia Studio project
  • apply editing techniques
  • share and produce a video file
16/01/2018 (Tuesday)
10am-12noon
5 Online synchronous discussions for tutorials using WebEx
Register now

Facilitator(s): Charina Ong & Jeanette Choy

Synopsis
The adoption of blended learning in higher education has advanced the use of technology to conduct tutorials through online synchronous discussion. Online synchronous discussions have the potential to enhance the study experience of students who are not able to attend the face-to-face class/tutorial. In this hands-on workshop, the facilitators will share a framework and some considerations for facilitating online synchronous tutorial discussion.

We will also introduce you to WebEx, a powerful Web conferencing application that allows you and your students to collaborate in a secure online environment. WebEx allows you to share documents and deliver presentations in real time using a Web browser and voice connection. The chat, Q&A, and poll features will definitely engage your students.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the key principles and best practices to engage, connect, and support students in 'real-time' online learning.
  • Use the WebEx communication tools to facilitate synchronous discussion and e-tutorials.
25/01/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
6 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
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Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
21/02/2018 (Wednesday)
9am-12noon
7 Promoting student engagement in large classes
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Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi

Synopsis
Teaching a large lecture class presents several unique challenges and therefore requires a higher level of planning – both practical and pedagogical. This session is planned taking into account research that shows an increase in learning gain when learning activities are carefully-designed to increase student engagement in their learning.

This workshop will introduce some of the best practices for tackling the large-lecture experience by focusing on three key areas: (i) getting students prepared for lectures, (b) promoting interactivity during lecture, and (3) encouraging team-based activities. Through hands-on activities and in-depth discussions, we will explore some research-informed active learning strategies that will enable you to create opportunities for effectively engaging students when teaching in large class settings.

Please bring your own device (BYOD) and join us in exploring how technology tools can support active learning and promote engagement in the classroom.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • understand the challenges faced in large classes;
  • design learning activities for active learning and engagment; and
  • explore how technology tools can be used to support the strategies that promote active engagment.
22/02/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
8 Writing and using Intended Learning Outcomes
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Facilitator(s): Adrian Lee & Alan Soong
22/02/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-4pm
9 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
23/02/2018 (Friday)
9am-12noon
10 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
26/02/2018 (Monday)
2pm-5pm
11 Designing an authentic learning environment
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Facilitator(s): Alan Soong
02/03/2018 (Friday)
2pm-5pm
12 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
06/03/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-5pm
13 Mid-term course feedback to promote student learning
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Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi

Synopsis
Many educators see mid-term feedback as one of the best methods that will strengthen the student-teacher relationship as well as provide valuable information on how they can improve their teaching. End-of-semester evaluations often emphasise perceived faculty “performance”, but with mid-term evaluations simple changes can be incorporated early on, to help motivate students and enhance student learning. Students tend to like this process because it gives them a chance to voice opinions on issues that are most critical to them, and they appreciate the fact that the instructor has solicited their opinions.

IVLE contains fairly comprehensive survey capabilities that allow you to assess student progress or get feedback from students. This workshop will show you how to create and manage question banks and online surveys using the IVLE Survey tool. The workshop will also explore the use of other tools like the questionSMS to gather feedback.

This workshop will be offered in a blended mode (online and face-to-face) and will comprise two parts:
(1) A pre-workshop video and discussion
(2) A face-to face hands-on session and discussion

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the key benefits and challenges of using mid-semester feedback
  • reflect on strategies and methods of collecting informal feedback; and
  • design a mid-semester feedback survey
08/03/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
14 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
13/03/2018 (Tuesday)
9am-12noon
15 Plagiarism prevention in NUS using Turnitin
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Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Kenneth Pinto

Synopsis
Plagiarism is defined as "the practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one's own" (New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998) without properly acknowledging the source. The growth of the internet has opened up numerous options for students to plagiarise. And in most cases, plagiarism is unintentional as students are unaware of paraphrasing, and citing. In this workshop, we will talk about why students plagiarise and discuss some strategies for designing assessments that can minimise plagiarism in student's work.

We will specifically look at Turnitin, a tool which is often mislabelled as a "plagiarism checking service". The session will debunk that myth and explore Turnitin's features, compare submission methods including a comparison between old and new IVLE integration, discuss myths that surround Turnitin and quickly run through Turnitin assignment set up in IVLE.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the reasons behind student plagiarism;
  • reflect on strategies that guide the academic writing process;
  • discuss strategies for designing assessments that can minimise plagiarism; and
  • set up a Turnitin assignment in IVLE.
13/03/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-4pm
16 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
21/03/2018 (Tuesday)
9am-12noon
17 Developing rubrics for assessing students' learning
Register now

Facilitator(s): Mark Gan & Kiruthika Ragupathi

Synopsis
A rubric is a scoring tool that lists the criteria for student work and articulates levels of quality for each criterion. It can help in communicating your expectations to students while also helping you in assessing student work fairly and efficiently. They can also provide students with informative feedback on their strengths and weaknesses, and prompt students to reflect on their own work.

In this workshop, we discuss key features of a quality rubric, present some examples of rubric for assessing student work. You will then have an opportunity to use the steps discussed to construct a rubric for one of your assessment tasks.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • describe the purpose of rubric in assessing student learning
  • understand how to use rubric to improve the results of assessment tasks
  • discuss various types of rubrics
  • identify components of and steps to developing a rubric
  • construct a rubric
22/03/2018 (Thursday)
9am-12noon
18 Using technology to scaffold student learning
Register now

Facilitator(s): Adrian Lee
28/03/3018 (Wednesday)
2pm-4pm
19 Promoting active learning in a STEM tutorial class
Register now

Facilitator(s): Adrian Lee
04/04/2018 (Wednesday)
2pm-4pm
20 Using ExamSoft for online assessments
Register now

Facilitator(s): Charina Ong
21 IVLE for teaching and learning: Getting started (IVLE: Part 1)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
IVLE (Integrated Virtual Learning Environment) is a learning management system designed to facilitate and supplement teaching and thereby, promote student learning at NUS. A comprehensive introduction to IVLE, this hands-on workshop will enable you to create and manage a module with emphasis on the commonly used tools like the workbin and the discussion forum. It will also cover a brief overview of the other tools available in IVLE.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • create and setup a module;
  • plan and scaffold teaching and learning activities;
  • disseminate content and digital multimedia; and
  • provide an overview of assessment and survey tools.
10/05/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
22 Facilitating effective online discussions using IVLE (IVLE: Part 2)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
Online discussions are a great way of extending classroom discussions and learning by getting students to engage with course materials and readings. A discussion forum is one of the most frequently used learning technology tools that supports online discussion. It is an alternative form of communication to in-class, verbal discussion – whether simply to provide variety in the subject, to meet the different needs and preferences of individuals, or to allow students time to reflect on the debate and consider their response before contributing. Forums allow for time-delayed communication and asynchronous learning – anytime, anywhere. In this hands-on workshop, we will focus on IVLE discussion forum that is widely-used on campus.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • differentiate asynchronous and synchronous communication tools;
  • facilitate and manage discussions using forums in IVLE; and
  • reflect on ways to enhance student-teacher interaction both inside and outside the classroom.
15/05/2018 (Tuesday)
10am-12noon
23 Assessing student learning using IVLE (IVLE: Part 3)
Register now

Facilitator(s): Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong

Synopsis
Assessment is a crucial element in enhancing the overall quality of teaching and learning in higher education. What and how students learn depends to a major extent on how they think they will be assessed (Biggs & Tang, 2007). This workshop focuses on the creation and use of assessment and quizzing materials for your courses using IVLE. Participants will discover how online assessment is valuable and how using these tools can create a dynamic learning environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • set up online tests and quizzes;
  • create question banks to create assessment questions, quizzes or MCQs;
  • analyse different situations for which an online assessment can be used; and
  • identify various approaches to provide timely and constructive feedback.
15/05/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-4pm
24 Online synchronous discussions for tutorials using WebEx
Register now

Facilitator(s): Charina Ong & Jeanette Choy

Synopsis
The adoption of blended learning in higher education has advanced the use of technology to conduct tutorials through online synchronous discussion. Online synchronous discussions have the potential to enhance the study experience of students who are not able to attend the face-to-face class/tutorial. In this hands-on workshop, the facilitators will share a framework and some considerations for facilitating online synchronous tutorial discussion.

We will also introduce you to WebEx, a powerful Web conferencing application that allows you and your students to collaborate in a secure online environment. WebEx allows you to share documents and deliver presentations in real time using a Web browser and voice connection. The chat, Q&A, and poll features will definitely engage your students.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the key principles and best practices to engage, connect, and support students in 'real-time' online learning.
  • Use the WebEx communication tools to facilitate synchronous discussion and e-tutorials.
17/05/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-5pm
25 Designing learning activities to promote active learning
Register now

Facilitator(s): Jeanette Choy

Synopsis
Active learning is associated with student centred learning where the students are actively engaged in the learning process, rather than passively absorbing information. Although teachers may choose from many available instructional or learning tasks, it is often not clear how they promote deep learning and more importantly, how teachers can modify existing activities to increase engagement, or to assess the level to which students are engage during learning.

The workshop “Designing Learning Activities to Promote Deep Learning: Using ICAP as a Guide” aims to investigate and understand the design of learning activities that foster deep learning. Participants will be introduced to key concepts relating to a theoretical framework for active learning known as ICAP (Interactive – Constructive – Active – Passive), developed by Michelene Chi (2009). A framework through which we can classify teaching techniques in relation to the degree of cognitive engagement that they foster, can help us develop and evaluate our approach and instructions. This will ultimately have the potential to improve student learning. Strategies to engage students during learning will be explored in this workshop. In addition, opportunities will be provided for participants to review their teaching strategies with inputs from facilitator(s) and peers.

References:
Chi, M. T. H. (2009). Active-Constructive-Interactive: A Conceptual Framework for Differentiating Learning Activities. Topics in Cognitive Science, 1, 73–105.

Workshop Approach
Workshop conducted in a flipped classroom format where participants are encouraged to review pre-workshop online materials (i.e. video recordings, reading article) prior to the face-to-face workshop. It will be interspersed with:
  • Sharing of principles and concepts in designing learning strategies to engage students during learning
  • Demonstration of active learning strategies to enhance interactivity for your lessons


Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Identify key considerations when selecting the appropriate kind of teaching strategies to engage students in deep learning; and
  • Apply the principles and strategies to design learning activities that promote active engagement during learning
23/05/2018 (Wednesday)
2pm-5pm