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Jul 2000  Vol. 4   No. 2
........   FOOD FOR THOUGHT  ........
Did you Know...

Over the past year, CDTL has been busy conducting several surveys. For your information, below are selected key data extracted from two of these surveys. For detailed information about either survey, please contact at 6516 3052.

Survey on Skills that Employers Desire in Their Graduate EmployeesDuration of survey: September-December 1999

 

Total number of questionnaires sent out : 1000
Total number of responses : 201
(90 foreign private firms,
32 government/statutory board organisations,
52 local private organisations,
27 private firms of mixed local and foreign ownership)

:
:


85% of employers are happy with our graduates.
15% of employers are unhappy with our graduates.

Overall Ranking of Shortcomings Mentioned by Unhappy Employers

  1. Lacking in initiative
  2. Poor attitude/lacking in humility
  3. Poor interpersonal skills
  4. Lack of practical knowledge (i.e. not street smart)
  5. Materialistic
  6. Lacking in problem-solving skills
  7. Lacking in flexibility/creativity/innovation
  8. Inability to work independently
  9. Unrealistic expectations
  10. Lacking in job commitment

 

Survey on Level of Utilisation of IT Tools by NUS Academic Staff

Duration of survey : September-November 1999
Number of responses from NUS teaching staff : 159
(or 10.8% of NUS teaching staff)

 

  • 78% of teaching staff receive fewer than 5 emails/day during a typical semester week. But more emails from students are received when assignment deadlines and examinations draw near.
  • 94% of teaching staff send fewer than 10 emails/day to their students during a typical semester week.
  • 30% of teaching staff have accessed an NUS online discussion forum.
  • 10% of teaching staff have accessed an NUS online chat.
  • 52% of teaching staff have accessed an NUS online bulletin board.
  • 69% of teaching staff have set up a course website or personal webpage on an NUS server. 36% of teaching staff do not update information on their webpages.
  • 71% of teaching staff indicate that using email to communicate with students will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses.
  • 43% of teaching staff think that participating in discussion forums will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses.
  • 35% of teaching staff think that participating in online chats will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses.
  • 78% of teaching staff think that having a course website will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses.
  • 41% of teaching staff think that using online bulletin boards will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses; 37% are uncertain.
  • 35% of teaching staff think that using web conferencing will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses; 36% are uncertain.
  • 40% of teaching staff think that the on-demand provision of online lecture presentations will improve the teaching and learning process in their courses; 30% are uncertain.

 

 

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Common Modules for Architecture and Engineering Students

Students on Bad Teaching (1)

Face-saving Devices in Peer Reviews & Their Implications

Open-Book Examinations

Millenial Milestone

Picures! Notes!

Get Professional: Training for New Teachers

When the Profs Get Together: TLHE Symposium

Read & Write

Hellos, Goodbye

Teaching & Learning Highlights
Innovative Teaching of Building Services to Students in the Department of Architecture Using IVLE

MEDNet: Towards an Intranet Learning Environment

A Survey of Part-time Students' Use of IVLE



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