Teaching Enhancement Grant (TEG) Talks 2015

Teaching enhancement grant (TEG) TALKS - November 2015

 

Facilitating discussions on education research and enhancements in teaching and learning amongst NUS faculty members

 

Date: 19 November 2015 (Thursday)

Time: 9.00am-1.00pm

Venue: Dewey Room, CDTL

Programme

TEG Talks 2015

TEG Talks 2014

TEG Talks 2013

 


 

 


 

Time

Presenters

 

9.00am-9.20am

VisuAlgo Online Quiz

Dr Steven Halim
Department of Computer Science


VisuAlgo is the Next Level of a previous project that has been presented in CDTL TEG talk last April 2013 (Learning Data Structures and Algorithms with Unified and Interactive Visualization). In this talk, we will present the major improvements that have been done in the past two years to make VisuAlgo a "world beater" today, especially the new Online Quiz feature of VisuAlgo. The Online Quiz system allows us to automate parts of our teaching that can sometimes be very boring: The automatic creation of random algorithm questions, the automatic and instant grading of students' answers, plus the automatic and instant feedback for the students whenever they submit wrong answers. We will present the success (and the limitations) of the current version of Online Quiz system when used in an NUS algorithm module.


Presentation Slides

9.20am-9.40am

Development of a user-friendly tool for teaching concepts in Fluid Mechanics

Dr Sachin Vinayak Jangam

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

 

In this project we developed a simple MS excel-based tool to effectively teach an industrially important topic “Pumps and Compressor” in a chemical engineering core module, Fluid Mechanics (CN2122). The time constraint is always an inevitable factor while teaching a module such as Fluid Mechanics with an extensive syllabus. A general feedback from industry also suggests improving students’ knowledge about pumps and compressors. The developed excel tool provides a step-wise selection and design procedure for pumps and compressors along with selected case studies. Students were asked to use this tool for a limited time which was followed by a class activity (in-class test) and a final examination to assess students’ understanding of the concept. The outcome of this project such as student performance and the student feedback giving their perspective about learning experience and effectiveness of this pedagogy activity will be discussed during this presentation.

 

Presentation Slides

9.40am-10.00am

Insightful Learning of Image-Guided Robotic Surgery System through Hands-on Educational Projects

Dr Ren Hongliang

Department of Biomedical Engineering

 

Surgical Robotic Systems are emerging as viable and novel engineering technologies in surgeries and interventions. Surgical robotic system aims to extend the ability of surgeons to plan and carry out surgical interventions more accurately and less invasively by incorporating imaging, accurate tracking and positioning modules. This involves multiple disciplinary researches, which make difficulties for students to understand the underlying fundamental theories just from class teaching. Hands-on projects will be a good way to enhance learning as “one must learn by doing the thing for though you think you know it”.


We propose an educational kit composed of multiple mini-projects to motivate the students to comprehensively understand the surgical robotic systems.  This aims to bridge the gap for enabling both bioengineering undergraduates and graduates to learn the fascinating robotic surgery system in a low-cost, desktop educational kit. The kit will have the capability to exhibit the key technologies & fundamental components involved in robotic surgery.

 

 

10.00am-10.20am

Video Recording Tool for Undergraduate Assessment and Learning - the Learning Component (VIRTUAL-L)

Dr Soh Lip Min

Department of Medicine

 

Using VIRTUAL-L, we aim to demonstrate that students’ competence in physical examination skills can be improved through self-assessment and/or tutor feedback with the aid of video recording. Our study showed that students were highly receptive to this mode of learning and felt that it was beneficial in improving their competency. The group that received video with tutor feedback achieved the highest abdominal examination scores, but this did not reach statistical significance perhaps due to the small sample size.

 

Presentation Slides

10.40am-11.00am

Preliminary study on the perceptions of students towards an open-book, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) final examination of a non-majors Biology class with large enrolment

Dr Seow Teck Keong

Department of Biological Sciences

 

A bring-your-own-laptop high-stakes open-book final examination for the LSM1301 General Biology module with an enrolment of 672 students was held in November 2013.  Pre- and post-exam online surveys were conducted to solicit the perceptions of the students with regards to the introduction of a bring-your-own-device open-book electronic final examination.  Focus group discussions were also held to deliberate on the perceptions in greater detail.  Both the surveys and discussions revealed several key areas of satisfaction and also areas for improvement.  The implementation and limitations of the exam will also be discussed.

 

Presentation Slides

11.00am-11.20am

"I hear I forget, I see I remember, I do I understand" - Development of large number templates of visual organizers and graphical illustrations

Dr Chiu Yu Ko

Department of Economics

 

This project aims to develop tools that will help teachers and students to draw illustrative diagram in computer. First, we develop a large number of easily customizable examples and templates to facilitate the creation of new graphics without the need to inventing the wheel again. Second, we create an online interactive software, based on html and JavaScript, to facilitate drawing of simple diagram. We will illustrate the program and discuss the experience and challenges of incorporation of graphic drawing in the class.

 

Presentation Slides

11.20am-11.40am

"So how do they really expect you speak up, when you get into the workplace?"

Ms Lee Gek Ling and Dr Radhika Jaidev

Centre for English Language Communication

 

Literature suggests university students need to be prepared to communicate in the workplace (Ng & Vernon, 2013).  Hence CELC developed the Test of Communicative Competence to enable students to diagnose their work ready communication skills to improve them before employment.  So were they prepared to communicate at the workplace? We found there was still a gap in preparedness, both in the formal and informal discussion skills, which were shown to be more prevalent for new hires because of their junior positions.  Moreover our graduates did not know how to communicate in the multi-generational and hierarchal workplace.

 

Presentation Slides

11.40am-12.00noon

Technology-supported workplace simulation: An integrated approach to prepare university students for work

Ms Norhayati Bte Mohd Ismail and Ms Chitra Sabapathy

Centre for English Language Communication

 

The presentation describes the redesign of an undergraduate level Professional Communication course to simulate a real workplace for the entire 12-week duration of the course. It presents reasons for necessitating the redesign, and a detailed description of how the technology-supported workplace simulation was carried out throughout the course. An analysis of students’ and tutors’ perceptions of the changes suggests that the intensive and integrated approach afforded by the workplace simulation motivated learning of the skills taught on the course.  The paper concludes with future plans and implications for the teaching and learning of professional communication skills in higher education.  

 

Presentation Slides

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching enhancement grant (TEG) TALKS - April 2015

Time

Presenters

 

9.00am-9.20am

Google-based Course Management System
Mr Andreas Dewanto
Department of Physics


  • Course Management System (CMS) provides instructors with a framework and a set of tools that will allow for easy creation of online course material, without one having to know or understand HTML or other computer languages. It equips instructors with the relevant tools for the subsequent teaching and management of that course, as well as the setting of up various online platforms for real time interaction with students. CMS does not only contain aspects of administration, but also deals directly with core aspects of teaching. Thus, a robust CMS should be able to: (1) support the placement of course materials online, (2) store students’ submissions, (3) track students’ performance, and (4) mediate communication between students and instructor. The speaker has found that Google has the necessary tools capable of making a robust CMS as described above. This talk outlines the speaker’s experience in using various Google Apps (e.g. Google Docs, Google Chart Tool, etc) to develop a classroom response system, to run in-class feedback systems as well as to organize and disseminate course information.

     

    As the talk will involve hands-on activity, attendees are encouraged to bring their own mobile devices along.


Presentation Slides

9.20am-9.40am

The Implementation of Vodcasting to Enhance Grammar Knowledge and Listening Skill in Upper Beginner Level of Bahasa Indonesia at CLS-NUS

  • Ms Johanna Wulansari Istanto & Ms Indrianti Tjan
    Centre for Language Studies

This study compares and evaluates the learning ability and performance differences between two classes of students undergoing Project-based-learning (PBL). More specifically, it examines if there are significant differences in knowledge score, problem-solving ability, and eventual project-deliverable outcomes. Key findings have indicated that students undergoing the hybrid PBL curriculum realized deeper fundamental formative knowledge, enhanced their problem-solving abilities, and produced better performing artifacts. This study further highlighted that first-time PBL students performed better under a hybrid PBL-lecture mode as they may lack the problem-solving and interpersonal skills needed to participate in full-fledge PBL sessions.

 

Presentation Slides

9.40am-10.00am

The Application of On-line Tools in Teaching Chinese Characters

  • Ms Lin Chiung Yao
    Centre for Language Studies

Chinese characters, Hanzi, are the unique characteristic of the Chinese language and have presented the greatest challenge for teachers and students. Until now, scholars in the field have not arrived at a generally–accepted method to teach Hanzi. With the advent of the computer, many teachers and scholars have tried to incorporate typing into learning and teaching Hanzi. Though many have stated the benefits of e-writing, the objectors argue the benefits of e-writing are limited and do not help long term memory of characters, and on the contrary, could actually be harmful to the handwriting ability of learners.

 

This study suggests an “e-handwriting” method which is made possible by the increasing popularity of mobile devices and technology.  By promoting e-handwriting, the advantage of traditional handwriting in long term memory and proficiency is preserved, while at the same time, the conveniences and efficiency of e-writing is capitalized on.

 

The initial findings show positive perceptions of learners which, given further studies, may suggest a potential pedagogical framework for learning and teaching Chinese characters.

 

Presentation Slides

10.00am-10.20am

Investigating Growth in Paragraph Writing Skills of Tertiary students

  • Dr Seyed Vahid Aryadoust
  • Centre for English Language Communication

This study investigates the development in paragraph writing ability of 116 undergraduate English as a second language (ESL) students enrolled in a paragraph writing course. Students wrote sample paragraphs before, during, and after the course, and these were marked on an analytical scale by multiple expert raters. The results were first subjected to many-facet Rasch model (MFRM) analysis to measure differences in rater severity and identify rater misfits; raters’ scores were anchored to these initial results to generate fair scores for students. Next, a curve-of-factors latent growth model was fitted to the scores. The results showed that students’ ability in multiple writing skills grew gradually and linearly from the beginning of the course. This progress was found to be independent of the writing prompts. Students’ development is attributed to a variety of facilitative factors, including explicit lessons and frequent practice, regular feedback through a continuous assessment (CA) approach and various opportunities to engage with class tutors, and the use of online technology in the course.

 

 

10.20am-10.40am

Application of Threshold Concept Theory to achieve Higher-order learning outcomes through use of Online Assessments

  • Dr Elliot Law
    Engineering Design and Innovation Centre

Most past studies on the use of online assessments have been focused on foundational courses where lower order cognitive skills are commonly engaged.  In this study, the question whether online assessments can be effectively used in higher level courses to promote higher order cognitive skills as lower order ones is explored.  Online assessments were adopted to monitor the learning progress of students in a higher level engineering course, in order determine whether (a) the online assessments helped to improve the general level of proficiency in this course, and (b) there were clear links between the levels of cognitive skills engaged in the online assessments with the final grades. 

 

Presentation Slides

11.00am-11.20am

Improving Problem-Based Learning with Student Tutors in a module of Food Product Development and Packaging

  • Dr Yang Hongshun
    Department of Chemistry

Students taking FST 3104 are required to do new product development (NPD) projects. Sstudents were divided into three groups with a tutor for each group to conduct this problem-based learning (PBL) practice based on NPD. Students were asked about their experience of this practice. Students’ feedbacks indicate that NPD in general is positive in improving students’ creative thinking and problem solving ability. A majority of students preferred face to face interaction with student tutors for help. These feedbacks could be applied to the future PBL based modules to improve students' learning efficiency.

 

Presentation Slides

11.20am-11.40am

Development of a Design Software to facilitate Integration of knowledge across modules while solving Process Design problems by Chemical Engineering students
Dr Eldin Lim
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

 

The capstone Design Project that all Chemical Engineering students need to undertake in the final year requires integration of knowledge acquired in all core modules to design a chemical plant. Various commercial software are available to carry out such plant designs. However, one of the subjects that is not well integrated into such process design software yet is CN3124 Fluid-Solid Systems. Consequently, many chemical engineering students view this subject as a standalone module that plays a supportive role towards other core modules in the curriculum. A fluid-solid systems software was developed in this TEG project and provided to students reading CN3124 to carry out a mini-design project. This software has been helpful in facilitating students to integrate their knowledge of CN3124 and other core modules taken within the same semester.


Presentation Slides

11.40am-12.00noon

Integrative Learning across disciplines : Engage students in Community Nursing
Ms Lau Siew Tiang & Ms Cindy Lee
Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies

 

Traditionally, clinical education is concentrated in the acute setting. However changes in the delivery of healthcare such as an ageing population and prolonged life expectancy, earlier discharges from hospitals, resulted in greater number of clients in the community needing continual care. The community continuum education (CCE) programme is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of community health nursing and promote its valuable contribution to health care system.  A total of 20 year 1 students participated in this pilot project. Data collection and analysis were done by a qualitative approach using focus group discussion. The students described the CCE as valuable because it deepens their appreciation of individual patient’s need in their homes and community; and raised their awareness of necessitate support beyond the hospital. The three main themes that emerged from the data analysis included professional development (knowledge, professional identity and spirit of inquiry), patient as human (respect, partnership, caring and information sharing) and teacher competence (teacher knowledge, planning learning experience and feedback).

 

Presentation Slides

12.00noon-12.20pm

Three Debates on Team Teaching

Dr Caroline Brassard
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

 

This session on team teaching is based on our combined experience in six semester-long modules at the graduate level using team and co-teaching in the last few academic years. We plan to address three debates in team teaching.

 

The first debate is whether team teaching enables deeper learning as compared to other types of teaching models. Our discussion also reviews the latest literature on team-teaching models, features, impacts and challenges.

 

The second debate is whether the design of team taught courses should fundamentally differ from single or co-taught courses. We use a comparative analysis of the team taught courses we designed and conclude on the key features that should (or should not) be included in team taught syllabi in order to foster deeper learning.

 

The third debate is, whether there are inevitable pitfalls and conflicts arising from team teaching. Based on the evidence from our student feedback, we discuss issues such as student perceptions and how to address the challenges of team teaching, and finally, we touch upon teaching evaluation of team teaching.

 

Presentation Slides
12.20pm-12.40pm

Development of a Statistical Framework for optimizing Team-based Learning Outcomes; where Baseball meets Medical Education

Dr Joshua Gooley
Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School

 

In team-based learning (TBL), students work in small teams to solve problems. Inspired by baseball sabermetrics, we examined the relationship between individual performance and team performance on exams taken across 6 years of the Brain and Behavior course at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School. For most teams, performance was not explained by a simple voting scenario or by deferring to the top academic performer with the team. Rather, team-based individual performance metrics were better at explaining variance in team scores, as compared to individual test scores. Such measures can potentially be implemented to better evaluate the effectiveness of TBL.


Presentation Slides